Hypertension is a silent disease that can be fatal

Yet up to half of the people with hypertension may be unaware they have it, as they do not exhibit any signs or symptoms. This is why hypertension is considered a silent disease and a global public health issue. The only way to know whether a person has hypertension is by having their blood pressure checked.

WHAT ARE THE IMPORTANT HYPERTENSION STATISTICS?

1.7

Billion

Around the world, hypertension affects about 1,7 billion people. It is the leading global risk for death. Hypertension is responsible for 1 in 8 (12.8%) deaths worldwide.

of people with hypertension don’t know they have it.

20 500

Deaths/day

In men, the prevalence is around 30%.

The prevalence of hypertension is around 25% in women.

In patients over 60 years old,the prevalence increases to 50%.

HOW CAN HYPERTENSION AFFECT THE BODY?

When a patient has hypertension, his heart has to work harder to ensure the flow of blood around the body. Over time, this high pressure can gradually weaken the heart and damage artery walls, leading to changes in blood flow. All these situationan lead to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (stroke, heart disease, and heart failure). Other parts of the body, including the kidneys, limbs, and eyes, may also suffer damage.

Stroke:

occurs when the brain’s blood supply is interrupted, leading to a rapid loss of brain function

Heart diseases:

Coronary heart disease : due to fatty deposits in the main arteries that supply your heart, which become clogged up

Heart attack : when the blood supply to your heart is blocked

Kidney failure:

when kidneys become less efficient at removing toxins, fluid and waste will accumulate

Loss of vision:

when damage occurs in small blood vessels in the retina

Atheroscletrosis:

when blood vessels narrow, leading to possible heart attacks and strokes

WHO ARE THE “BAD FRIENDS” OF HYPERTENSION?

Sometimes other diseases can worsen or impact a primary disease. These other diseases are what we call comorbid diseases. Hypertension has its own set of “bad friends,” the main ones being:

Hypercholesterolemia:

When there are high levels of LDL-cholesterol in the blood, which are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease.

Diabetes:

Occurs when the cells of the body do not respond well to insulin, a hormone controlling blood sugar levels. As a result, blood sugar levels rise. High blood sugar levels over a prolonged period lead to complications such as stroke, foot ulcers, and eye damage.

Coronary artery disease:

A limitation of blood flow to the heart leads to a lack of oxygen for myocardial cells. A common symptom is chest pain, which often occurs during exercise.

Chronic kidney disease:

When over a period of months or years, kidneys do not function properly, leading to complications such as cardiovascular disease, anemia, or pericarditis.

HYPERTENSION: A WORLDWIDE PROBLEM

Although the proportion of hypertensive patients (prevalence) varies in different parts of the world, every global region is affected.